Tag Archives: theater

pics from the last show

We had a blast at the last show! Come to the next one:

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar
249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, March 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door
FOR TICKETS AND DIRECTIONS

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meet the actors

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, March 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door, via www.stickyseries.bpt.me

Ali Ayala in Libby Emmons' "Soft Song Like Doves" and in Anthony Noack's "Apple Martini"

Ali Ayala in Libby Emmons’ “Soft Song Like Doves” and in Anthony Noack’s “Apple Martini”

Sticky Director / Producer 2004-Present. Glad to be back. Not going anywhere.

Cate Bottiglione in Liam Kuhn's "Kissing Weird"

Cate Bottiglione in Liam Kuhn’s “Kissing Weird”

Actor, director, cat litter connoisseur. resumes.actorsaccess.com/cateb
Tricia Fukuhara in Anthony Noack's "Apple Martini"

Tricia Fukuhara in Anthony Noack’s “Apple Martini” and J. Michael Grey’s “Moment of Truth”

TRICIA FUKUHARA is excited to make her “Sticky” debut. A recent graduate of NYU, you may have spotted her doing backbends in the library basement, sprinkling pixie dust in parades at Disneyland, defeating the Huns on Disney Cruise Line, or toying with your psyche in Blackout “House.” When not performing, she can often be found harmonizing with the Sirens of Gotham and lindy hopping at your local speakeasy. Come see her in Comfort Women: A New Musical at 54 Below. Or just ask her about her cat.

Amina Henry in Judith Leora's "Where We Ended Up"

Amina Henry in Judith Leora’s “Where We Ended Up”

Amina Henry is a playwright and teaching artist who occasionally moonlights as an actress. As an actress she has worked with the Hangar Theater, Classical Theater of Harlem, Rehabilitation Through the Arts, and Sticky, among others.

Eliel Lucero in Judith Leora's "Where We Ended Up"

Eliel Lucero in Judith Leora’s “Where We Ended Up”

Jimmy Pravasilis in Anthony Noack's "Apple Martini"

Jimmy Pravasilis in Anthony Noack’s “Apple Martini”

An Actor and Musician, Jimmy Has been a Sticky regular for a few years and thanks to all those who cast him and support Sticky for all these years.

 

Jacob Saxton in J. Michael Grey's "Morning of Truth"

Jacob Saxton in J. Michael Grey’s “Morning of Truth”

Jacob Saxton is excited to be working with Sticky again! As he has now for the past few years. Hailing from the mountains of North Carolina, Jacob came to this crazy town 12 years ago to chase the dream. When not acting he likes to be crafty, working as a leathersmith and woodworker. He is single, and you wont find him on tinder so come to the show!

Stephanie Shipp in Judith Leora's "Where We Ended Up"

Stephanie Shipp in Judith Leora’s “Where We Ended Up”

Stephanie Nicole Shipp is thrilled to be performing with Sticky again! She was last seen in Target Margin’s Stein Lab series at the Bushwick Starr. She is a member of East River Commedia and co-producer of The Underground Theater Festival. She has collaborated and performed in Lhotakova & Soukup Company’s production of  “Beethoven Live” in Prague at Divaldo Archa and New York’s PS122. As well as with Obie-award winning Hoi Polloi Co. production “All Hands”. She has performed several seasons at the Metropolitan Opera in “Das Rheingold” and “Parsifal”. More information http://www.stephanieshipp.com

Joel Stigliano in Judith Leora's "Where We Ended Up"

Joel Stigliano in Judith Leora’s “Where We Ended Up”

Joel Stigliano National Tour Elf: The Musical, NY: Daylight Precision,Tooth Fairy Tale Regional: Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged),The Full Monty, Sherlock Holmes, The Buddy Holly Story, The Crucible, The Cherry Orchard, and Blithe Spirit among many others. MFA Acting: Ohio University. Proud member of NYMAC. Many thanks to Judith for being a writer, to Michele for being a director, and Marissa for everything else. http://www.joelstigliano.com

Lindsay Torrey in Liam Kuhn's "Kissing Weird"

Lindsay Torrey in Liam Kuhn’s “Kissing Weird”

Lindsay Torrey is an actor and teaching artist living in Brooklyn. Theater credits include NYTW, Clubbed Thumb, Polybe+Seats, Target Margin, Premiere Stages, The Clarence Brown Theater and Project Shaw. TV/film: “Blue Bloods,” “Onion Sportsdome,” “Guiding Light,” First World Problem. BA from Columbia University, MFA from The University of Tennessee. www.lindsaytorrey.com

Eve Udesky in Libby Emmons' "Soft Song Like Doves"

Eve Udesky in Libby Emmons’ “Soft Song Like Doves”

Eve Udesky is THRILLED to be back with Sticky. That’s it.

Ari Vigoda in J. Michael Grey's "Morning of Truth"

Ari Vigoda in J. Michael Grey’s “Morning of Truth”

Ari is excited to get Sticky once again!  It’s been his longest relationship in the city and the one worth keeping, even when she moved to Brooklyn.  Be sure to check out the web-series “Brunch on Sundays,” now playing on Funny or Die.  Thanks for supporting independent theater.  Cheers!  http://www.arivigoda.com

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, March 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door, via www.stickyseries.bpt.me

It felt like a question about our marriage: talking Sticky with David Marcus

When Dave and I started Sticky in 2000, which you can read about here, we could not have guessed that it would still be happening 15 years later. Not only is this thing we created still happening, it’s happening without our creative involvement. (I mean Dave’s going to host the show Thursday, and Ali’s directing my play Ipsa Domus, but we’re not like deciding things or running around to rehearsals.) So I figured I’d talk to Dave about that.

This is us in 2002 in the space where we produced our last Philly show. I think Dave is showing Libby how to work his Palm Pilot.

This is us in 2002 in the space where we produced our last Philly show. I think Dave is showing Libby how to work his Palm Pilot.

Libby
Do you remember when we were doing Sticky at Bar Noir in Philly and Brad Rothbart asked us if we could forsee a Sticky ever happening that did not have us at the helm? Do you remember what we said?

Dave
I recall Brad asking if there could be a Blue Box production without us, which I think is a different question. I said no. I don’t recall what you said. A Sticky without us is not the same. Sticky is a form we invented, but one which anybody can use. I remember sensing that Brad’s question was about more than art though, it felt like a question about our marriage, about the way we choose to relate to each other. When we run a show it kind of revolves around us, Everybody else, (though to a lesser extent Scholnick, Matt or Ali, our co producers) seem to be in our orbit. But I think that’s how we wanted it. At least it’s how I wanted it.

Libby
I don’t remember what I said either. Alot of our marriage has been about art. There’s always like this external thing that we’re beholden to, and until 5 years ago that main thing has been art projects. It’s interesting because over those past 5 years– since C was born– we’ve worked much more independently, and the blue box designation has faded. I do things under li88y inc, like Puff Puff, or How to Sell Your Gang Rape Baby for Parts (that’s right kids), and you do freelance writing or Spotlight Right. Even Sticky is on this new site. It’s like the new blue box production is our kid. I wonder if we’ll do more big art projects together or if that’s run its course. What do you think?

Dave
It’s hard to say. I suspect we will at some point. There is so much to do now that everything is a blur, so it’s the stuff lands that we focus on, not the stuff that needs nurturing. Right now our individual projects are the ones landing, so it’s what we do. When it was just the two of us it was easier to throw spaghetti against the wall. But these things have a way of coming around.

Libby
How does it feel to have Sticky happening here in Brooklyn, under the guidance of Ali Ayala, Eliel Lucero, and Michele Travis, and out in Normal, IL, with J. Michael Grey at the helm?

Dave
It feels wonderful. These are all accomplished and talented artists. I’m really grateful to see Mike doing it in Illinois and for the producers who we have here at Beauty Bar. I’ve always thought theater has to be faster, drunker and more social, so anytime anyone is moving in that direction I’m happy. And its humbling to have people want to do it with the name Sticky. A lot of times, when there is innovation in any area you see the initial cats who envision the thing eventually overtaken by the ones who can perfect it. I’ve always thought of us, as producers anyway, as the former. We don’t have the patience or desire to run a big theater company, to have a huge impact, we just have fun and try to present good work. It it can spread and grow through the artistry and hard work of others then I think we did what we can do.

Libby
Speak for yourself! I still want a venue. I would be a kick ass venue owner. I have it all planned out, even the part where the place doesn’t go broke. Do you think Sticky still has a place in the NYC indie theater scene? There’s loads more bar play shows happening now than there were when we started.

Dave
I wasn’t sure if Sticky had a place, but given that there are people here, and in Illinois who won’t let it die I guess there must be. Sticky is the embodiment of my theories on theater. The idea of event over object, the low overhead, the profane rather than sacred nature of it, the whole notion of being in a room together. I’m not sure the other bar series are quite the same, most don’t have quite the same slacker quality. But in general I’m always happy to see theater move off the stages and into more social environments. I have little doubt it is the future of the form, and that’s probably why it’s being propagated so regularly now.

You can come see Sticky this week! It’s on Thursday.
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, February 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door
via www.stickyseries.brownpapertickets.com

introducing the actors and directors

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, February 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door
via www.stickyseries.brownpapertickets.com

Ali Ayala, is in and directs J. Michael Grey’s Shamed to the Heart, and directs Libby Emmons’ Ipsa Domus.

Dewey Caddell

Dewey Caddell, in Libby Emmons’ Ipsa Domus

I do lots of things in front of people.  Visit my website at thedewey.com and follow me on Twitter @deweycaddell

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Todd Faulkner, in Hal Corley’s Dolor

Todd Faulkner is deep in revisions on his first novel, and recently wrote a one-act play for Route 66 Rodeo (of which he is a founding member, http://www.route66rodeo.org). As an actor, Todd has appeared in recurring roles in The Americans, The Following, Blue Bloods, Nurse Jackie, and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. He will also appear in the upcoming gothic horror film Angelica, starring Jena Malone. Onstage, he recently appeared as Sarge/Scarlett in the York Theatre’s critically acclaimed off-Broadway production of Yank! A New Musical. Much love to my amazing co-star (of many years), and our greatest co-production, our son Griffin.

Nicole Greevy, in Hal Corley's Dolor

Nicole Greevy, in Hal Corley’s Dolor

Nicole Greevy is thrilled to be working with Todd Faulkner and Michele Travis.  Together, they last collaborated on a production of Down the Road, and Nicole has worked with Michele on many other projects.  With Todd, she co-created the web series Exorcists Local 667 and Extreme Parenting, and she is also co-creator of the independent pilot Living in Captivity, and appeared in the Bravo series Pregnant in Heels. She can be heard narrating a variety of characters in audiobooks available on audible.com, including FBI Special Agent Constance Mandalay, of In the Bleak Midwinter.  nicolegreevy.com

Travis Hendricks, in David L. William's Sing Your  Song Quickly

Travis Hendricks, in David L. William’s Sing Your Song Quickly

Eliel Lucero, directs David L. William’s Sing Your  Song Quickly

Zoe Metcalfe-Klaw, in Libby Emmons' Ipsa Domus

Zoe Metcalfe-Klaw, in Libby Emmons’ Ipsa Domus

Zoe is super excited to be back with the STICKY crew! She’s been getting sticky with most of these people for years. When she’s not acting, she can be found practicing yoga, eating avocados, or running around the mean streets of Park Slope. www.zoemetcalfeklaw.com

 

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Veronica Newton, in J. Michael Grey’s Shamed to the Heart

Veronica Newton is an actor and writer. She is delighted to be part of Sticky. Prior Sticky manifestations include acting in Libby Emmons’s The Sustainable Future and Jeremy Basescu’s Sensitive Eyes, and writing A Toast with Champale. Follow me on Twitter @veronicanewton

James Pravasilis, in J. Michael Grey's Shamed to the Heart

James Pravasilis, in J. Michael Grey’s Shamed to the Heart

Sarah Sakaan, in Brooke Berman's Quiet Bar

Sarah Sakaan, in Brooke Berman’s Quiet Bar

SARAH SAKAAN is a New York City based Syrian-American theater maker, actress and writer. She is the Associate Artistic Director of the Brooklyn, NY based theater company Polybe + Seats. As a Playwright in Residence at LPAC- LAB for 2014-15 she is writing the new play, The Art of Hijab, Kohl Black and the Right Way to Pray. With Polybe + Seats she recently developed Anna Asli Suriyah (I Come from Syria). Some acting credits include The Corsair and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Columbia University; King Lear with Balloon Heaven Productions; Sybil Kempson’s KurbisGeistNacht at Dixon Place; BlueBox Production’s Stickies, and Connie in Detroit; and Post Mortem, Offending the Audience and Dawn at the Flea. Film credits include “Oh Boy!”, Shot at Sundown and Project NIM. She has a B.F.A. in Acting from Emerson College.

Jacob Saxton, in Brooke Berman's Quiet Bar

Jacob Saxton, in Brooke Berman’s Quiet Bar

Jacob Saxton is excited to be working with Sticky again! As he has now for the past few years. Hailing from the mountains of North Carolina, Jacob came to this crazy town 12 years ago to chase the dream. When not acting he likes to be crafty, working as a leathersmith and woodworker. He is single, and you wont find him on tinder so come to the show!

Michele Travis directs Hal Corley’s Dolor and Brooke Berman’s Quiet Bar

Eve Udesky, in Libby Emmons' Ipsa Domus

Eve Udesky, in Libby Emmons’ Ipsa Domus

Eve Udesky is THRILLED to be back with Sticky.  That’s it.

Ceren Zorlu, in David L. William's Sing Your  Song Quickly

Ceren Zorlu, in David L. William’s Sing Your Song Quickly

Ceren Zorlu was born in Ankara, Turkey, but has been a native New Yorker since she had enough teeth to bite the big apple. Being bilingual has made her a very versatile actress.  She has studied film making at NYU and stumbled into the the world of acting at the insistence of her instructors who saw her as “raw talent”. Since then she has studied the Meisner technique for three years with JoAnna Beckson and completed improvisational comedy training at The Peoples Improv Theater in New York City.

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, February 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door
via www.stickyseries.brownpapertickets.com

 

I have done terrible things and things I am ashamed of: talking Sticky with Ali Ayala

Ali, Michele, and Libby checking out Grace McLean's set at Lincoln Center last night.

Ali, Michele, and Libby checking out Grace McLean’s set at Lincoln Center last night.

Ali has been with Sticky since 2004, and has been co-producing since 2005 (I think). She is anti social media, but I got her to do the interview anyway. The above blurry picture was the best I could get her to give me.

Libby
What’s your favorite thing about being alive?

Ali
I guess this is a ridiculous answer, but my favorite thing is the act of being alive itself. Being alive is no easy thing. It is heartbreaking and breathtaking, terrifying and beautiful. Your life is the greatest asset that you can own. You get to shape it and plan it, but there is no real road map so it ends up being this huge glorious mess of mistakes and triumphs and you never know where you will end up or what you will end up with, but it is yours whatever it is.

Libby
Are there any you don’t want to own? I have some memories that come upon me unsummoned in which I find myself behaving in a way that is completely humiliating, or perhaps anathema to who I think I am. I’ve known you long enough to guess that you have those too. If you could change those moments, would you? Or do you think a person needs to redefine themselves? Or do we suffer our continuous faults?

Ali
Memories? Experiences? Mistakes? Yeah, there are PLENTY that I don’t want to own! I have done terrible things and things I am ashamed of and things that when I think about my actions I want to weep for that ridiculous person that could not possibly have had anything to do with the person I believe myself to be. But I do own them and I can’t change them. The best I can hope for is that maybe I won’t do that one particular thing again. But, knowing me, I probably will. People constantly redefine themselves and yes, we do suffer our continuous faults. We are all trying to cope with who we are and what we might become. But that is not a unique feeling to me. There is no one without regret. We are all just trying to figure it out.

Libby
What’s your favorite thing about Sticky?

Ali
I have been doing Sticky with you and Dave for I think 11 years now, so obviously I love everything about it from production meetings to rehearsals to performance. Every time we do a Sticky (and we have done a lot) I am as excited and amazed by the show as I was at the first Sticky. And I think it just keeps getting better. If I had to pick what is most important to me about Sticky is the community that it has created. Many of my closest friends have come from the Sticky family in some way. And those that did not show up at every show!

Libby
If you could make Sticky happen anywhere, money and vacation time are no object, where would it be?

Ali
Though I think that Sticky is just tailor made to work best in NYC, when I see people’s reactions to Sticky and when I see what J. Michael is doing with Sticky in the Sticks and how he has had such an outpouring of support from his community there, I know it can work anywhere. That said, for my own personal enjoyment and if money / time / vacation were no problem, I would love for Sticky to be the vacation. Or rather be something of a traveling show. I would love to take a small Sticky team and travel around, spending a few weeks to a month in each city before moving on to the next. Roadtrip Sticky!

Libby
If it was frontier times, would you head out West or stay home?

Ali
If it was frontier times, I think heading West would be the way to go. It would be an adventure. We could do shows, run a bar and try not to get shot. Not so different than our trip to Crete!

Libby
Do you think danger makes things more fun? Like that time in Crete at the monastery with the olive trees and the gun shots? Is danger part of what makes life more enjoyable?

Ali
Danger certainly makes things more exciting and more memorable. If we had gone to that monastery in Crete and been able to go inside and look around and then walked around the hillside, that would have been lovely and enjoyable and we likely would not have discussed it again. But as it was, it was locked despite our best efforts to get in, and your uncle is crazy and wanted to steal an olive tree and then someone shot at us! Now that is a story! I like stories.

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, February 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door
via www.stickyseries.brownpapertickets.com

Every dialogue is a dance: talking Sticky with Eliel Lucero

eliel

Eliel’s been with Sticky since way back in the Bowery Poetry days. Poet, performer, bartender, Eliel is now jumping into the center ring to co-produce the series, and direct a short play as well.

Libby
What’s your favorite thing about being alive?

Eliel
My Favorite thing about being alive is the not knowing what will happen next.  It’s also what I’m the most afraid of, but the fear is what feeds the excitement in life.  The unknown.  We can plan all we want but shit is just going to be what it wants to be, and all we can do is adjust and keep on rolling.

Libby
What’s your biggest fear? Mine is fire, and in a greater sense, loss.

Eliel
My Biggest fear is becoming nothing, or being a bored mediocre cliché.
I fear being trite.  I’m also really afraid of cars.  Being in them mostly.  I often have dreams where I am driving and everything goes terribly wrong.  In these dreams I am usually trying to drive from the back seat or the passenger side.  I don’t know why I don’t sit in the driver side.  I never want to have a license or a car or ever be a driver.

Libby
What’s your favorite thing about making art?

Eliel
My favorite thing about making art is of any discipline, is the creating of life.  Starting out with something in one state, and breathing yourself into it to make something brand new out of it.  Be it a character or a song or directing a play or writing a poem or painting something, it is all a metamorphosis that could not have been made the same way by anyone else.  If the art is true, the artist has a conversation with art, making sure that they both inform each other.

Libby
How is the conversation different between poetry and theater?

Eliel
I don’t know that there is much difference.  In poetry you use less words, but the careful choice of words is always there in both.  What I love so much about the short play model is that these plays are exactly like poems.  They try to say more with less.   The full play would be more like a novel.  You still have the time to explain and build and set up a narrative.  With the short play and poems you have to be really cautious about every single word and action therein.

Many playwrights have been poets and vice versa.  From Miguel Piñero to Federico Garcîa Lorca, to Langston Hughes to Amiri Baraka aka Leroy Jones.

Every monologue and soliloquy is a poem.  Just like every dialogue is a dance.

Libby
If it was frontier times, would you head out West or stay home?

Eliel
In Frontier times I don’t know what I would do.  It probably depends if I have masters or not.  I personally love the great metropolis.  The hustle of people criss crossing each other while shedding small influences in one another’s lives.  In Jonah Lehrer’s book “Imagine” he calls this the power of Q.  The amount of people that influence other people and take that influence to a group of new people, each of them with their own power of Q.  I would live where the most people live.  But again it depends if I was a free man or a slave.

Libby
Which gives your imagination freer reign?

Eliel
Between Free man or Slave?  I would say Free man.  I would never want to be a slave.  I also have very little interest in traveling back in time.  I’ll only do so as a spectator, or for a get rich quick scheme.  If I had a T.A.R.D.I.S I’d travel to the future and all of space obviously.

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, February 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door
via www.stickyseries.brownpapertickets.com

I’m an optimist: talking to Michele Travis

Michele and Lucy.

Michele and Lucy.

Michele is a new producer to Sticky, and is one part of the Sticky 552 triumvirate: Michele Travis, Eliel Lucero, and Ali Ayala. Libby Emmons, Sticky co-founder, talked to Michele about the basics: being alive, making art, and time travel.

Libby
What’s your favorite thing about being alive?

Michele
Every aspect of it is preferable to the alternative, at least so I imagine. There’s only one way to find out, right? And I’m not interested in exploring that.

Libby
There’s this old trope that if a person was immortal they would regret it, having to watch people they loved age and die, watching the world do whatever horrible things the world will continue to do, never being able to move on. Would you take immortality if you had the chance? Do you think there’s something essentially human about mortality?

Michele
I would absolutely not take immortality if I had the chance – I function considerably more effectively with deadlines, ha ha. The combination of losing all my favorite contemporaries and having endless experience and knowledge, witnessing the generations of humans making all the same mistakes over and over, would most likely make me a monster. Isn’t that what’s so awful about vampires? It’s not the blood drinking; it’s the lack of empathy.

Libby
What’s your favorite thing about theater?

Michele
The way we all have to be in the same place at the same time, both to make it and to watch it. I love the immediacy, and the control we have over the audience’s experience. Everything – the volume of the pre-show music, the level of the house lights, even the temperature – is up for consideration in service of the storytelling. As you know, I recently had my first tiny experience with making a short film. While it was lots of fun in the moment, since everyone involved was delightful company, I find the amount of time it takes to complete what is essentially the telling of a 10-minute story distressing. I mean, this thing still isn’t finished! Not to mention how weird it is to imagine it out there someday randomly unspooling without help or guidance from any of us. That doesn’t happen to a production onstage.

Libby
I know you’re directing a Brooke Berman play for Sticky, and her plays are very atmospheric. Is that part of why you picked the play? Do you have ideas about how the Sticky atmosphere will work with Brooke’s?

Michele
Now that you ask, that quality is probably what attracted me, but it wasn’t a conscious thing. Years ago I directed a reading of one of Brooke’s short plays that was pretty much set in the central character’s imagination. I loved how she was able to make that a clear element of the work, and yet the play was full of high stakes interactions between very delightful, earthy characters.  This play is lyrical and not at all naturalistic, yet full of quotidian detail – I think it is both set in a bar, and someplace else entirely. I have a lot of ideas about it, but I don’t want to give too much away. Everyone should come see it and tell me if it works or not!

“The Sticky atmosphere” is a great phrase. I’m fascinated by private behavior in public, which is a huge factor in New York City life in general, and in just about every play set in bar anywhere.

Libby
If it was frontier times, would you head out West or stay home?

Michele
One of the best things about being a woman is that we do not have any “good old days.” There was nothing great about being a 19th century woman, except possibly hats.  However, having watched DEADWOOD (which was brilliant), I would choose the lawless and terrifying frontier, to have a greater degree of autonomy and possibilities for reinvention. Being Kitty Leroy or Calamity Jane would have been a lot more entertaining than being a wife or a servant in the settled and civilized part of the country. Even being a frontier prostitute was probably better than being an urban whore back then — seller’s economy!

Libby
Ah yes, hooking in the good old days of the wild west. I’ve often thought that if I were thrown back in time to the old west– because I have spent a fair amount of time thinking about it for unknown reasons– I would want to open a restaurant, with entertainment, which would probably include the whole brothel thing. When women imagine living in the past, sex and how to use it plays a huge role. Do you think that women in the future will imagine time traveling back to the 21st Century in the same how-do-I-make-sexual-subjugation-work-for-me centric way?

Michele
I’m so glad we have the same notions about imaginary life in the old west (and have spent considerable time thinking about it)! I would absolutely go into business with you and help run the restaurant/dance hall/brothel. I hope women living in the future have a harder time entering into this imaginative exercise than we do. I would like to think they will be completely fascinated and appalled by 21st century sexist bullshit, that they won’t be able to relate to that aspect of our lives at all because they have no experience of a non-egalitarian society. I’m an optimist.

Sticky 552
Beauty Bar, 249 5th Avenue, Brooklyn, 11215
Thursday, February 5, 7:30 pm
$10 advance, $15 at the door
via www.stickyseries.brownpapertickets.com